CATRINA Dia de los Muertos

CATRINA Dia de los Muertos Celebration is a MULTICULTURAL EVENT DEDICATED TO THE DAY OF THE DEAD AND THE AMAZING CULTURE THAT SURROUNDS IT.

MUSICA, TACOS & DRINKS
CATRINA FASHION SHOW AND CONTEST .
ALL THE PROFITS WILL BE USED TO BUY CHRISTMAS TOYS FOR KIDS IN NEED.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23TH.
6 P.M.- 11 P.M AT THE DELTA EVENT CENTER.
SPONSORS WANTED
REPRESENT YOUR BUSINESS WITH A CATRINA, SEND US AN EMAIL TO MISSNEWMEXICOLATINA@HOTMAIL.COM
TICKETS | DONATION $20
NO KIDS UNDER 15 YEARS OLD.
BUY YOUR TICKETS AND REGISTER FOR THE CONTEST AT DELTA FLOWERS AND YOSELIN’S BOUTIQUE (233 N PASEO OÑATE, ESPAÑOLA, NM. 87532, (505)753-4511).
FOR MORE INFORMATION please visit:  CATRINA

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2021 AT 6 PM – 11 PM at the Delta Event Center at 233 North Paseo de Oñate in the beautiful Española Valley!

History of the day of the dead:
The Day of the Dead (el Día de los Muertos), is a Mexican holiday where families welcome back the souls of their deceased relatives for a brief reunion that includes food, drink and celebration. A blend of Mesoamerican ritual, European religion and Spanish culture, the holiday is celebrated each year from October 31- November 2. While October 31 is Halloween, November 1 is “el Dia de los Inocentes,” or the day of the children, and All Saints Day. November 2 is All Souls Day or the Day of the Dead. According to tradition, the gates of heaven are opened at midnight on October 31 and the spirits of children can rejoin their families for 24 hours. The spirits of adults can do the same on November 2.

Origins of Day of the Dead

The roots of the Day of the Dead, celebrated in contemporary Mexico and among those of Mexican heritage in the United States and around the world, go back some 3,000 years, to the rituals honoring the dead in pre-Columbian Mesoamerica. The Aztecs and other Nahua people living in what is now central Mexico held a cyclical view of the universe, and saw death as an integral, ever-present part of life.

Upon dying, a person was believed to travel to Chicunamictlán, the Land of the Dead. Only after getting through nine challenging levels, a journey of several years, could the person’s soul finally reach Mictlán, the final resting place. In Nahua rituals honoring the dead, traditionally held in August, family members provided food, water and tools to aid the deceased in this difficult journey. This inspired the contemporary Day of the Dead practice in which people leave food or other offerings on their loved ones’ graves, or set them out on makeshift altars called ofrendas in their homes.